The Wind That Shakes The Barley

Last night I watched  a movie called “The Angels’ Share,” which is the story of a bunch of Glaswegian rapscallions brought to self-awareness through interaction with the world of expensive whisky. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1924394/

During a whisky tasting scene, some ponce drones on about a whisky named Glenfarclas. I remember that the first bottle of malt whisky I ever bought was a Glenfarclas. It was in St Andrews in 1970. http://www.glenfarclas.co.uk/. I muse:

Flow gently, Glenfarclas amang thy green braes,
Flow gently, I’ll sing thee a song in thy praise;
My Mary’s asleep by thy murmuring stream,
Flow gently,Glenfarclas, disturb not her dream.

It’s no frae Islay but it’s whisky just the same.

Anyway, today I had lunch with my good friend Hideo Yamasaki. He is Vice-President of the University of the Ryukyus and a good bloke. He brings with him a gift from the President, the much esteemed Iwamasa sensei. It is a bottle of 1980 Glenfarclas!

An untypically unsmiling Hideo holding the object

Iwamasa sensei is a great connoisseur of malt whisky. He has given me the two best bottles I have ever consumed. https://quietripple.wordpress.com/2011/06/18/the-best-day-of-my-life/

Anyway, isn’t life great!

Thank you Iwamasa sensei

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4 Responses to The Wind That Shakes The Barley

  1. Alan says:

    Clearly a guy to be treasured that Iwamasa! That bottle is unobtainable here now. The 1991 version, also sold out, was last listed at £180. Only to be drunk whilst lighting Havanas with £50 notes. Brings to mind Sydney Smith’s “My idea of heaven is eating pate de foie gras to the sound of trumpets.” Enjoy!

  2. Alexander mcGillivray says:

    It’s important to note that it must be cask strength or ‘105’…there are lesser products from the Grant family (no relation to Standfast) that cause only minor excitement.

    I was recently in correspondence with these good people to complain about corks disintegrating and contaminating the precious liquid. Apparently this fault was an unintended consequence of the very high proof and has since been corrected

  3. zedmac says:

    It’s a great wee film, isn’t it? Though I was grateful for French subtitles as the broad Glaswegian was utterly in-com-pre-hen-sible for a lass like me. x

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